Sep
6
to Oct 17

Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies)

What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from? What kind of life settles into our bones if we don’t take the time to grieve these losses? Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it?

We will focus on surviving and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences. The dominant narratives about the survivor body— oft pathologized as disembodied, disassociated and unwell— will be turned on their heads. We can never actually leave our bodies, as hard as we might try (and as wise as we are in our reasons for trying) and are therefore always already embodied.

Too often survivors that are also writers are told to not dwell in the trauma, that writing from personal and traumatic experience isn’t “legitimate” writing. I don’t believe that to be true and am regularly heartened and inspired by the writing people do while diving into the wound(s).

In this 6 week workshop we will engage with work written by a wide range of writers, generate our own body of work through interrogating the roots of trauma and how it manifests in the body and explore body-based writing can help support us as we write into the wound. The trauma doesn't have to just live in our body; it can be moved from living within our skin and be rewritten onto paper (and computer screens).

"How people feel, what they feel, what breaks them, how trauma resonates through their lives . . . that’s a legitimate space in poetry." —Claudia Rankine

 

"Write backwards from the dissipated, exploded, violent body. Write the blows backwards until you make a real body. This movement of a body through space, how to reduce the pain of this body, the pain of a static, habitual, repeated movement-- impact-- is what I mean by healing. Not resolution, but a rewriting in neuromuscular terms of gesture." — Bhanu Kapil

 

“What’s fertile in a wound? Why dwell in one? Wounds promise authenticity and profundity, beauty and singularity, desirability. They summon sympathy. They bleed enough light to write by. They yield scars full of stories and slights that become rallying cries. They break upon the fuming fruits of damaged engines and dust these engines with color. And yet—eyond and beneath their fruits—hey still hurt. The boons of a wound never get rid of it; they just bloom from it.”— Leslie Jamison

Note: "Wound Dwelling" is language drawn from Leslie Jamison's work on wounds and pain.

Week by Week

Week 1 // The Survivor Body(ies)

Week 2 // The Survivor Body as a "Failed Body" and Using Failure to Create

Week 3 // Wound Dwelling as a Creative Practice and Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 4 // Wound Dwelling as an Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 5 // Wound Dwelling: The Body(ies) in Pleasure and Pain

Week 6 // Wound Dwelling: Moving Beyond Dominant Narratives

General outline for each week:
•    Review guidelines for holding space for each other and writing into traumatic material in order to foster a safe(r) space
•    2-3 readings from other writers drawing from poetry, creative non-fiction, and a little trauma theory
•    Questions to generate discussion
•    Offerings of writing prompts, response, and discussion

Who Should Take This Class

This class is for anyone who is looking to mine the embodied knowing of traumatic experience — all bodies, genders, and identities. Whether someone is looking to delve more deeply into personal experience or needing to get through writer’s block that lives deep in the well of their body it will be helpful for people who are writing memoir, creative non-fiction, poetry, and fiction.

Format

This is an online class. Each week, a new section of the course will open full of resources, reflections, exercises, discussion questions, and writing prompts. Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week perusing resources and readings, answering a discussion question, engaging in exercises, and responding to peers’ work.

Note from the teacher: Working with trauma is inherently risky and challenging writing often comes from places of harm. I want to offer a space that is safe but also know that I can’t guarantee (because of the vast scope of trauma) that we won’t be triggered at times. I’m very invested in creating a container for us to write in and I will offer guidelines for writing together that honor individual experience and affirm the difficult writing we will share with each other. I come to this work as a survivor of multiple forms of violence, as a writer and artist and I have a background as a community organizer and as an emergency room rape crisis counselor. I want to be in and create spaces that honor the myriad ways our survivorhood can look, spaces that honor all genders, identities and experiences and I want to be open to growing and shifting the spaces I create to meet the needs of the individual people I work

That said, it is important to note that I am not a licensed therapist so if you feel like you are at a particularly tender or charged moment in your healing process it might also be helpful to have a therapist or someone you trust to be on deck to offer further support. If you have specific concerns or accessibility needs, please contact the facilitator. 

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Wound Dwelling : Writing the Survivor Body(ies)
Sep
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

Wound Dwelling : Writing the Survivor Body(ies)

Saturday September 16th 6pm-8pm

What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from? What kind of life settles into our bones if we don’t take the time to grieve these losses? Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it?

In this somatic writing workshop we will focus on translating surviving and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences. The dominant narratives about the survivor body(ies)— often pathologized as disembodied, disassociated and unwell— will be turned on their heads. We can never actually leave our bodies, as hard as we might try (and as wise as we are in our reasons for trying) and are therefore always already embodied.

As a group we will explore texts, utilize Breathwork and body-focused writing prompts and share our work with each other as we engage in conversation about writing as a tool for healing and connecting to our wise bodies. There will also be a shared altar so please bring meaningful and protective items to help us hold space.

Exchange: $40 

Sign Up Online ! 

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Apr
18
11:30am11:30am

Queering Sexual Violence & the Politics of Healing

Join Queering Sexual Violence: Radical Voices from Within the Anti-Violence Movement editor Jennifer Patterson as she takes a look at anti-violence work, survivorhood & healing. Often pushed to the margins, queer, transgender and gender non-conforming survivors experience high levels of sexual violence yet lack services and supportive spaces in which to begin the lifelong healing process. And what is healing when trauma is frequent or deeply rooted in systems bigger than individuals? What are the barriers, and who are the gatekeepers making sustainable healing difficult? What can healing look and feel like outside the dominant narratives of medicalization and pathologization? How can we reimagine our support and healing spaces in order to hold space for many narratives of harm and healing?

There will also be a writing workshop led by Jennifer on April 17th.

*open to Colgate students and staff only

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Writing With Trauma: with Jennifer Patterson + Michael Crumpler
Mar
4
1:00pm 1:00pm

Writing With Trauma: with Jennifer Patterson + Michael Crumpler

WRITING WITH TRAUMA

With: Jennifer Patterson + Michael Crumpler

Living with HIV can be a traumatic experience. Caring for someone living with HIV can be a traumatic experience. In this workshop, writers will have an opportunity to write alongside trauma about their experiences of HIV with the help of Jennifer and Michael. Both will share their work, and their talent to help people work their own thoughts and feelings through writing.

Part of a multi-week series called:

HIV WITH

This 5 - part writing workshop series brings together writers, care givers and others living with HIV and impacted by the epidemic to share their experiences and skills. The workshops are free, and open to the public. Some experience with HIV and a desire to write is all you need to participate. Brought to you by Poets and Writers and What Would an HIV Doula Do?

Series Curator: Theodore Kerr & Poster Artwork: Virgil Taylor

Bios: 

Jennifer Patterson is a grief worker who uses words, threads and plants to explore queer survivorhood, body(ies) and healing. She is the editor of Queering Sexual Violence: Radical Voices from Within the Anti- Violence Movement (2016), facilitates trauma-focused writing & embroidery workshops and has had writing published in places like OCHO: A Journal of Queer Arts, The Establishment, HandJob, and The Feminist Wire. She is also the creative nonfiction editor of Hematopoiesis Press with the first issue out in January 2017. A queer and trans affirming, trauma-informed herbalist, Jennifer offers sliding scale care as a practitioner with The Breathe Network as well as through her own practice Corpus Ritual Apothecary. Jennifer also recently finished a graduate program with a thesis focused on translating embodied traumatic experience through somatic practices and critical and creative nonfiction. You can find more at ofthebody.net

Michael Crumpler is a member of the What Would an HIV Doula Do? collective. He has his MDIV from Union Theological Seminary and has worked as an organizer, pastor, and chaplain. He brings to all his work his experiences as a Black Gay Man living in the US who lives with love, hope, addiction, HIV, and community. Michael blogs regularly at mjcrumpler.wordpress.com. He has written a draft of his memoir. His story, and writing have been featured in the following media: After Party, Poz Magazine; Spiritual Care: Finding Your Way, Healthcare Chaplaincy Network webinar series testimonial feature about spiritual needs of living with HIV (May, 2015); From Faith To Faith: An Analysis Of My Personal And Theological Movement From Right To Left And The Journey In-Between, Master of Divinity thesis read by Drs. James H. Cone and Gary J. Dorrien, Union Theology Seminary (April, 2015); Making Sense Of My Military Service And My Christian Faith, Plainviews® (March, 2015); Faggot, adolescent theory paper recommended for Publishing By Dr. Pilar Jennings, Professor Of Psychology And Religion, Columbia University (April, 2014).

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Wound Dwelling: Writing and Stitching the Survivor Body(ies)
Nov
16
to Dec 15

Wound Dwelling: Writing and Stitching the Survivor Body(ies)

What: 5 week writing & embroidery workshop that will meet Wednesday nights
Dates & Time: November 16 through December 14th 6:30pm-8pm
Cost: FREE!! 
In the interest of keeping a smaller space, there is room for 10 people. 

This space is for queer & trans people who self-ID as victims/ survivors/ thrivers and more. Also, survivorhood is inclusive of so many things and while this will be largely centered on sexual violence, theres space for the many intersections of traumatic experience that so many of us are moving through.

Please plan to commit to all 5 weeks & RSVP to yesthisjennifer [at] gmail [dot]com BY NOVEMBER 14th.
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What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from? Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it? In this class we will focus on survival and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences. The dominant narratives about the survivor body(ies)— oft pathologized as disembodied, disassociated and unwell— will be turned on their heads. We can never actually leave our bodies, as hard as we might try (and as wise as we are in our reasons for trying) and are therefore always already embodied. Too often survivors that are also writers are told to not dwell in the trauma, that writing from personal and traumatic experience isn’t “legitimate” writing. 

Reading work by Arianne Zwartjes, Bhanu Kapil, Tara Hardy, Amber Dawn, Melissa Febos, Leslie Jamison, T Fleishmann, Reina Gossett, Kazim Ali (and so many more) we will also generate our own written body of work as we consider how embodied practice(s) (like writing and stitching) can be utilized to support our writing from the body and through trauma. In the final class we will also work on translating the writing into an embroidery pieces as an active meditation. A wound as a word as a picture, giving shape to the energy rippling in a body after experiencing trauma(s)— moving from skin to paper and fiber.

Note: “Wound Dwelling” is language drawn from Leslie Jamison’s work
----
Accessibility info coming soon.

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Wound Dwelling: Writing and Stitching the Survivor Body(ies)
Sep
29
to Nov 3

Wound Dwelling: Writing and Stitching the Survivor Body(ies)

The School of Making Thinking is an artist/thinker residency program, an experimental college, and a nomadic investigation in intentional living. The mission is to create a unique environment where participants are able to develop a creative practice that challenges disciplinary conventions of art-making, thinking and living.

In collaboration with The School of Making Thinking and Abrons Art Center, I am offering an 8 week somatic writing workshop. 

From September 29 through November 17, 2016 on Thursdays at 7 – 9 PM
8 sessions for $180 | Register

What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from?  Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it? In this class we will focus on survival and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences.  Reading work by Arianne Zwartjes, Bhanu Kapil, Melissa Febos, Amber Dawn, Chris Abani, TC Tolbert, Claudia Rankine, T Fleischmann, Kazim Ali (and so many more) and working with theory and visual art (embroidery and performance artists) we will generate our own written body of work as we consider how embodied practice(s) (like writing and stitching) can  support our writing from the body and through trauma. We will also work on translating the writing into embroidery pieces and will use embroidery as an active meditation.

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Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies)
Sep
14
to Oct 25

Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies)

Enroll here.

What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from? What kind of life settles into our bones if we don’t take the time to grieve these losses? Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it? We will focus on surviving and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences. The dominant narratives about the survivor body— oft pathologized as disembodied, disassociated and unwell— will be turned on their heads. We can never actually leave our bodies, as hard as we might try (and as wise as we are in our reasons for trying) and are therefore always already embodied. Too often survivors that are also writers are told to not dwell in the trauma, that writing from personal and traumatic experience isn’t “legitimate” writing. I don’t believe that to be true and am regularly heartened and inspired by the writing people do while diving into the wound(s).

In this 6 week workshop we will engage with work written by a wide range of writers, generate our own body of work through interrogating the roots of trauma and how it manifests in the body and explore body-based writing can help support us as we write into the wound. The trauma doesn't have to just live in our body; it can be moved from living within our skin and be rewritten onto paper (and computer screens).

"How people feel, what they feel, what breaks them, how trauma resonates through their lives . . . that’s a legitimate space in poetry." —Claudia Rankine

"Write backwards from the dissipated, exploded, violent body. Write the blows backwards until you make a real body. This movement of a body through space, how to reduce the pain of this body, the pain of a static, habitual, repeated movement-- impact-- is what I mean by healing. Not resolution, but a rewriting in neuromuscular terms of gesture." — Bhanu Kapil

“What’s fertile in a wound? Why dwell in one? Wounds promise authenticity and profundity, beauty and singularity, desirability. They summon sympathy. They bleed enough light to write by. They yield scars full of stories and slights that become rallying cries. They break upon the fuming fruits of damaged engines and dust these engines with color. And yet—eyond and beneath their fruits—hey still hurt. The boons of a wound never get rid of it; they just bloom from it.”— Leslie Jamison

Note: "Wound Dwelling" is language drawn from Leslie Jamison's work on wounds and pain.

Week by Week

Week 1 // The Survivor Body(ies)

Week 2 // The Survivor Body as a "Failed Body" and Using Failure to Create

Week 3 // Wound Dwelling as a Creative Practice an Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 4 // Wound Dwelling as an Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 5 // Wound Dwelling: The Body(ies) in Pleasure and Pain

Week 6 // Wound Dwelling: Moving Beyond Dominant Narratives

General outline for each week:
•    Review guidelines for holding space for each other and writing into traumatic material in order to foster a safe(r) space
•    2-3 readings from other writers drawing from poetry, creative non-fiction, and a little trauma theory
•    Questions to generate discussion
•    Offerings of writing prompts, response, and discussion

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Aug
27
12:30pm12:30pm

Supporting Survivors of Sexual Violence - Infusing Your Healing Arts Practice with a Trauma-Informed Lens

Join The Breathe Network for this specialized and experiential training for healing arts and health + wellness practitioners seeking to enhance their work with survivors of sexual violence. 

Drawing from personal testimony, cutting-edge research and professional insights, our team will provide an in-depth conversation about the impacts of sexual trauma, along with the tools and resources to assist participants in fostering a trauma-informed environment for the people they serve in a variety of healing settings. 

The training will include interactive presentations from practitioners of the following modalities - holistic personal training, yoga, herbalism, writing, addiction recovery, and more. Each presenter will demonstrate how these practices can meet the unique mind-body-soul needs of survivors and be modified and delivered most effectively for trauma resilience.  

Tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/supporting-survivors-of-sexual-violence-trauma-informed-care-training-tickets-26324600589

Presenters Include -

Jane Clapp

Jane Clapp is a master of mind, body and soul. While it is widely accepted that mindfulness is necessary to shape the body, Jane asserts that the body is one of the most powerful alchemic tools for shaping the mind. A practitioner in the holistic health industry for two decades, Jane combines personal training with tension and trauma healing to help clients gain strength, mobility and energy. As the founder of Urbanfitt, Jane has helped more than a 1000 clients improve emotional and nervous system regulation, positively shift neuroplasticity and release somatized stress and trauma.

Learn more: http://www.thebreathenetwork.org/jane-clapp

Mark Gerow

Mark Gerow is an Experienced Registered Yoga Teacher certified in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. He uses Emotional Freedom Technique, trauma-sensitive tools based on Somatic Experiencing, Trauma-Sensitive Yoga as well as Tension + Trauma Releasing Exercises (TRE) and various meditation and breath techniques to help clients manage anxiety, pain relief, triggers, insomnia and other symptoms. He is the Mind Body Spirit Director at Mountainside Treatment Center in Caanan, Connecticut. Mark is also the Founder/Creator of Lunarhythms Yoga™, and draws on a diverse background including his service as a survival instructor in the U.S. Air Force to his work as an actor in New York City, in his unique blend of flowing yoga which combines various styles and incorporates elements to include chakras, ayurveda, yoga therapy, and organic movement. 

Learn more: http://www.thebreathenetwork.org/mark-gerow

Jennifer Patterson

Jennifer Patterson is an herbalist, grief worker, writer and creative who uses words, threads and plants to explore queer survivorhood, the body and healing. She is an herbalist who centers queer and trans trauma, survivorhood and grief in her practice & through her apothecary Corpus Ritual. Coming from a disability justice and healing justice framework, she works to center queer and trans survivors and people who are moving through sexual violence and other forms of trauma. Jennifer is also the Editor and a contributing writer to the recently published anthology, Queering Sexual Violence: Radical Voices from within the Anti-Violence Movement.

Learn more: http://www.thebreathenetwork.org/jennifer-patterson

Karen Rose

Karen Rose is a Master Herbalist and the owner of Sacred Vibes, an apothecary in Brooklyn, NY. She is a single mother of three, who owns her own business, of African American descent, loves fashion and is a trained Master Herbalist. Born and raised in Guyana until she was in her early teens, she was no stranger to natural/nature medicine, it was part of her breeding. As with many of those of Caribbean heritage, "bush medicine" was the back bone to her healing process. Karen is the portrait of a modern urban herbalist. The study of herbalism is the most defining aspect of her life. It is incorporated in all areas of her life from the way she raises her children to her basic everyday decisions.

http://www.sacredvibeshealing.com/meetkaren.html

Molly Boeder Harris

Molly Boeder Harris is the Founder and Executive Director of The Breathe Network and an Experienced Register Yoga Teacher. She has worked in community-based rape crisis centers as a medical and legal advocate and has provided crisis intervention support and prevention education for students on two college campuses. After a decade of anti-violence advocacy work, Molly has completed two years of the 3-year certificate training in Somatic Experiencing (SE) - a body-inclusive, therapeutic approach to healing trauma that naturally complements and informs her teaching and work with trauma survivors. 

Learn more: http://www.thebreathenetwork.org/molly-boeder-harris


Space is limited, please register in advance to secure your spot!

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Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies)
May
20
6:00pm 6:00pm

Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies)

Please register here.

What is the physicality of a wound? What types of loss feel nearly impossible to come back from? What kind of life settles into our bones if we don’t take the time to grieve these losses? Can we dive into the wound, the loss: excavate and unearth it? We will focus on surviving and survivorhood; what it looks and feels like to live beyond traumatic experiences. The dominant narratives about the survivor body— oft pathologized as disembodied, disassociated and unwell— will be turned on their heads. We can never actually leave our bodies, as hard as we might try (and as wise as we are in our reasons for trying) and are therefore always already embodied. Too often survivors that are also writers are told to not dwell in the trauma, that writing from personal and traumatic experience isn’t “legitimate” writing. I don’t believe that to be true and am regularly heartened and inspired by the writing people do while diving into the wound(s).

In this 6 week workshop we will engage with work written by a wide range of writers, generate our own body of work through interrogating the roots of trauma and how it manifests in the body and explore body-based writing can help support us as we write into the wound. The trauma doesn't have to just live in our body; it can be moved from living within our skin and be rewritten onto paper (and computer screens).

"How people feel, what they feel, what breaks them, how trauma resonates through their lives . . . that’s a legitimate space in poetry." —Claudia Rankine

"Write backwards from the dissipated, exploded, violent body. Write the blows backwards until you make a real body. This movement of a body through space, how to reduce the pain of this body, the pain of a static, habitual, repeated movement-- impact-- is what I mean by healing. Not resolution, but a rewriting in neuromuscular terms of gesture." — Bhanu Kapil

“What’s fertile in a wound? Why dwell in one? Wounds promise authenticity and profundity, beauty and singularity, desirability. They summon sympathy. They bleed enough light to write by. They yield scars full of stories and slights that become rallying cries. They break upon the fuming fruits of damaged engines and dust these engines with color. And yet—eyond and beneath their fruits—hey still hurt. The boons of a wound never get rid of it; they just bloom from it.”— Leslie Jamison

Note: "Wound Dwelling" is language drawn from Leslie Jamison's work on wounds and pain.

Week by Week

Week 1 // The Survivor Body(ies)

Week 2 // The Survivor Body as a "Failed Body" and Using Failure to Create

Week 3 // Wound Dwelling as a Creative Practice an Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 4 // Wound Dwelling as an Embodied & Somatic Practice

Week 5 // Wound Dwelling: The Body(ies) in Pleasure and Pain

Week 6 // Wound Dwelling: Moving Beyond Dominant Narratives

General outline for each week:
•    Review guidelines for holding space for each other and writing into traumatic material in order to foster a safe(r) space
•    2-3 readings from other writers drawing from poetry, creative non-fiction, and a little trauma theory
•    Questions to generate discussion
•    Offerings of writing prompts, response, and discussion

Who Should Take This Class

This class is for anyone who is looking to mine the embodied knowing of traumatic experience — all bodies, genders, and identities. Whether someone is looking to delve more deeply into personal experience or needing to get through writer’s block that lives deep in the well of their body it will be helpful for people who are writing memoir, creative non-fiction, poetry, and fiction.

Format

This is an online class. Each week, a new section of the course will open full of resources, reflections, exercises, discussion questions, and writing prompts. Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week perusing resources and readings, answering a discussion question, engaging in exercises, and responding to peers’ work.

Note from the teacher: Working with trauma is inherently risky and challenging writing often comes from places of harm. I want to offer a space that is safe but also know that I can’t guarantee (because of the vast scope of trauma) that we won’t be triggered at times. I’m very invested in creating a container for us to write in and I will offer guidelines for writing together that honor individual experience and affirm the difficult writing we will share with each other. I come to this work as a survivor of multiple forms of violence, as a writer and artist and I have a background as a community organizer and as an emergency room rape crisis counselor. I want to be in and create spaces that honor the myriad ways our survivorhood can look, spaces that honor all genders, identities and experiences and I want to be open to growing and shifting the spaces I create to meet the needs of the individual people I work

That said, it is important to note that I am not a licensed therapist so if you feel like you are at a particularly tender or charged moment in your healing process it might also be helpful to have a therapist or someone you trust to be on deck to offer further support. If you have specific concerns or accessibility needs, please contact the facilitator. 

View Event →